Chrome Frame.

There are a lot of great things to say about Google Chrome Frame, and it’s in pure Avalonstar style that I add something a little late to the party. Granted, it’s not so much “adding” to the conversation as it is “complimenting.” For a designer whose site you’re on now blocked IE6 outright in its last incarnation1, hearing about this almost brought a tear to my eye.

You have to love it when you have a world full of geeks trying to figure out the problem of how to bring the slow child of the family up to speed. In Google’s case, if Microsoft couldn’t bare to retire their oldest browser for the multitude of reasons available, then hack it. When it comes down to it, if the kid’s not gonna do his homework, then you’re gonna have to do it for him.

Geez, does that bring back memories. Anyway…

When you’re sitting on the cusp of finally getting rid of having to deal with Internet Explorer, it’s very tempting to push the naysayers off cliffs—and cliffs they shall be pushed off of. Personally, this has been a long time coming. A lot of crap was taken for refusing to support the IEs in the past, but I felt it was the right thing to do (and a year later, so did a lot of other people). I’m not going to waste my time figuring out if Chrome Frame is the best way for this to happen. This isn’t the time for that. This shift needed to happen yesterday, and if Chrome Frame is the best way to do it, so be it. I’m on the train and begging the conductor to throw some coals in the fire. I’m just glad that it’s Chrome and even more ecstatic that it’s Webkit.

I’m tasking myself with spreading the word in my “not-so-tech-savvy” communities. We all know we’re going to do it, and it’s time we helped get this train moving.


  1. I actually haven’t looked at Redemption in IE6 yet, but the only reason they won’t see the BSoD that Distortion was known for was… that I forgot to put it in. I guess that’ll go in “when I have a home page.”